Brainmate
“brainmate’s service is the early warning system for industry and the economy.
You listen every day to the weather forecast – but how often do you check the IP your business is built on?”

Overview

brainmate has developed a sophisticated database which covers all relevant sources of national and international patent information. This unique infrastructure enables our patent lawyers to perform a comprehensive analysis of your company’s specific situation, which is then complemented by detailed advice from industry and technology experts.

Intangible assets are now the main factor in the valuation of enterprises. The valuation share of intangible assets compared to the entire market capitalization for the S&P 500 companies increased from 38% to 87% over the period 1982 - 2002*. The only way of protecting the key elements of intangible assets is through IP rights, using patents to safeguard technical innovations. Patents are essential for innovation-driven industries, which is borne out by the huge rise in lawsuits and IP-related transactions, all involving billions of dollars.

There is now a high demand for professional guidance and consulting services in this field. brainmate offers its services to:
   
Experts suspect that there are often quite significant misestimations in the valuation of patents. It is easy to appraise a company’s real estate. Defining the value of a patent is much more complicated. Whether there is an over- or an underestimation - both errors can lead to very costly bad decisions.
 
  *Source: Brookings Institution, Washington D.C., USA

Quotes on brainmate

„Reading the patent information and literature carefully not only enterprises, but also regions can check and compare their technology profile with the competitors ... By doing so decision makers in economy, science, politics and administration can receive valuable information.” Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Erich Greipl
President and Peter Driessen, Director, Bavarian Chamber of Industry and Commerce, Patent-Report Bavaria 2011
“Nothing is as unclear as the future. There are many tools for forecasting and sketching a scenario of upcoming changes in the competitive landscape. They all suffer from a lack of precise information. Probably the only perfectly accurate instrument is an analysis based on the research of the patents that have been granted up to today. Nobody spends a lot of money on a patent if he is not willing to commercialize it. And that will take place in the next 3 to 10 years.” Dr. Péter Balas
Deputy Director-General for Trade, European Commission